Drafting Chair Vs Office Chair – How They Differ In 2023

Reviewed By Chiropractic Specialist

Regarding furniture for the office, comfort and support are essential. Many people are torn between a drafting chair and an office chair, offering a unique set of features.

A drafting chair is typically higher than an office chair, offering adjustable armrests and an adjustable footrest.

An office chair, on the other hand, is typically lower and offers adjustable lumbar support and tilt and swivel capabilities.

Both chairs offer something different, but how do you decide which is best for you?

Choosing an office chair to fit your office space can be challenging. Let me help you choose the right type.

Overview of a drafting chair

A drafting chair is designed for work that requires a lot of sitting. It features a high back that provides good lumbar support and usually has a headrest.

Overview-of-a-drafting-chair

This chair is excellent for people who spend long hours at a desk, especially if they experience back pain or discomfort due to prolonged sitting.

A drafting chair’s seat is typically made of leather, while its frame is made of metal with chrome or stainless-steel accents.

Some drafting chairs are ergonomic, with a contoured seat and lumbar support that adjusts to fit a user’s specific needs.

These chairs are great for people who work long hours at a desk since they promote good posture and help users avoid discomfort.

Because these chairs are often higher than office chairs, they might not be suitable for shorter people.

Additionally, some drafting chairs are not as adjustable as office chairs, which is something to keep in mind if you’re a shorter person and are considering a drafting chair.

Overview of an office chair

Overview of an office chair

Office chairs are designed for people who spend long hours at a desk. These chairs typically have a lower seat than a drafting chair, which makes them ideal for shorter people.

In addition to being lower to the ground, office chairs usually have a smaller and less pronounced backrest than drafting chairs.

Some office chairs also have a slimmer seat and a lower backrest than drafting chairs, which makes them ideal for shorter people.

Office chairs often have an ergonomic design that promotes good posture and helps users avoid discomfort.

Some office chairs have a contoured seats that can be adjusted to fit a user’s specific needs. These chairs are great for people who work long hours at a desk since they can help promote good posture and reduce the risk of discomfort.

There are several types of office chairs, including swivel chairs, task chairs, and executive chairs. Each type has its own features, so it’s important to choose a chair with the parts you need for your office environment.

Comparison of drafting chair vs office chair

Comparison of drafting chair vs office chair

Regarding drafting and office chairs, there are a few key differences between the two. First and foremost, drafting chairs are typically higher than office chairs.

Another difference between these two types of chairs is the design of the chair’s seat. Office chairs usually have a contoured seat that can be adjusted to fit a user’s specific needs, while drafting chairs typically have a flat seat.

Another significant difference between drafting chairs vs. office chairs is the presence of armrests. While drafting chairs often have armrests, office chairs are rarely equipped with armrests. While both types of chairs can be great additions to any office space, they each have their benefits.

A drafting chair is typically higher than an office chair, which benefits shorter people. However, an office chair is usually lower to the ground than a drafting chair, which helps shorter people.

1

Types of drafting chairs and office chairs

Types of drafting chairs and office chairs

In terms of style, there are two main types of drafting chairs:

Traditional drafting chairs and captain’s chairs.

Traditional drafting chairs are great for people who are shorter since these chairs typically have a higher seat and footrest than captain’s chairs.

Captain’s chairs are often designed for taller people since they have a lower seat and footrest than traditional drafting chairs.

There are several different types of office chairs. Most office chairs are standard, but you can also find ergonomic and computer/laptop chairs.

Standard office chairs have a lower seat and footrest than ergonomic and computer/laptop chairs.

Ergonomic office chairs and computer/laptop chairs are great for people who work long hours at a desk since they promote good posture and help users avoid discomfort.

2

Seat height

Seat height

When choosing between a drafting chair and an office chair, it’s essential to consider the seat height of each chair.

Drafting chairs are typically higher than office chairs, which might not be suitable for shorter people.

If you’re shorter than average, look for an office chair with a lower seat. When comparing seat heights,

it’s important to note that the seat height listed on a chair’s product page is usually the seat height of the chair’s seat rather than the seat height of the entire chair.

So, if you’re comparing two chairs and notice that one chair has a higher seat than the other, you’ll want to measure the actual seat height of each chair to see which seat is higher.

3

Features/Adjustments

Features/Adjustments

When comparing drafting chairs vs. office chairs, you’ll also want to consider each chair’s features.

Some drafting chairs have adjustable armrests, while some office chairs have adjustable lumbar support.

Consider drafting chairs if you’re examining a chair with adjustable armrests.

Consider office chairs with adjustable lumbar support. If you’re peeking for a chair with both adjustable armrests and adjustable lumbar support, you’ll likely come across various drafting and office chairs.

While drafting and office chairs have pros and cons, you can compare the features of each chair to decide which chair is best for you.

4

Price

Price

When comparing drafting chairs vs. office chairs, you should also look at the price of each chair.

While some drafting chairs can be reasonably expensive, you can find a few relatively affordable ones.

If you’re on a budget, consider drafting chairs.

If you’re darting for an office chair with a lower price tag, consider peeking for office chairs with fewer features or a more basic design.

Although drafting and office chairs have benefits, you can find a drafting chair at a lower price than an office chair.

5

Footrest/Foot ring

Footrest/Foot ring

Many drafting chairs feature a footrest/foot ring, which is excellent for people with foot pain or discomfort.

You’ll likely find drafting chairs with footrests and foot rings if you search for them. Despite this, not all office chairs have a footrest/foot ring,

So, consider drafting chairs if this feature is essential to you.

6

Armrest

Armrest

Another significant difference between drafting chairs vs. office chairs is the presence of armrests.

While drafting chairs often have armrests, office chairs are rarely equipped with armrests.

Drafting chairs may be a good option if you want an armrest.

If you’re concerned about having armrests in your office space, consider office chairs since they usually have minimal or no armrests.

What to consider when choosing between a drafting chair and an office chair?

When deciding between drafting and office chairs, it’s important to consider your specific needs.

If you spend long hours at a desk, it’s essential to choose a chair that promotes good posture and helps you avoid discomfort.

You’ll want to find a chair with the features you need to promote good posture and help you avoid discomfort.

When comparing both chairs, you’ll want to consider the seat height of each chair, the type of chair you need (swivel, task, or executive), the design of the chair’s seat, and the type and amount of features each chair offers.

By comparing drafting chairs vs. office chairs, you’ll be able to find the best chair for your needs.

FAQS

Can a drafting chair be used as an office chair?

Yes, A drafting chair is specifically designed for use in a design studio, focusing on comfort, support, and great style. These chairs are available for both home and office use. DADO has both traditional drafting chairs and contemporary designs and colors to choose from. They even have a line of drafting furniture, including benches, stools, and tables.
When choosing a drafting chair in your home or office, consider the room’s furniture layout, including seat height, armrests, back support, and color and design. A good fit will keep you comfortable as you work on your projects.

What is the point of a drafting chair?

An American named George Nelson invented the drafting chair. It was made in the late 1940s to respond to the agonizing hours spent by designers and artists sitting on a straight-back chair. The design is adjustable to conform to the body’s natural curves, thus reducing lower back pain. Its unique, continuous contoured seat allows the user to adjust its height for the best position for their legs and feet. The chair swivels and has a locking mechanism that will enable you to stay in one place without getting up and down.
As it was meant to be sited in front of a drafting board, it also has a built-in footrest on one of its legs. No wonder this chair quickly became popular and is still used in offices worldwide.

Are drafting chairs good for posture?

Drafting chairs are great for posture because they force you to sit straight. I’ve never had back or neck pain from using drafting chairs. Their ergonomic design makes them so comfortable and healthy for your body. I recommend buying a drafting chair if you spend a lot of time sitting at a desk.

Ron Mason
I, Ron Mason, am a retired forestry professional. My previous profession was that of an environmental educator, specifically as a Forester, with the USDA Forest Service. Additionally, I have worked as a contract forester in the private sector. With a strong background in science and engineering, my expertise lies in timber stand management, forest ecology, and wildlife biology. I am a dedicated woodworker and take pleasure in crafting furniture, tables, cabinets, and other wooden items as a hobby.