How To Disassemble An Office Chair – Quick And Easy Way

Reviewed By Chiropractic Specialist

If you spend long hours at work or school, your office chair may become quite uncomfortable.

The good news is that most office chairs easily remove their upholstery and other components so you can clean them thoroughly and put everything back together again.

If your chair has one of those crazy spinning wheels, check the manufacturer’s instructions to see if it needs to be removed before cleaning.

Even standard wheelchairs have instructions on how to take them apart for cleaning. The pieces of an office chair are fairly self-explanatory:

You will find a seat, armrests, and some casters (or “wheels”) on your chair.

Depending on its age and design, you could see a few smaller pieces, like screws, here and there. Read on to learn how to disassemble an office chair step by step.

Steps Of How To Disassemble An Office Chair?

What You’ll Need To Disassemble An Office Chair?

The most important thing is ensuring you have the right tools for the job. The best tools are the ones you already own.

If you don’t have the right tool for the job, you can usually find something close to your local hardware store. For this task, you will need the following:

A Phillips-head screwdriver (or a screwdriver with a socket that fits your chair’s screws) A pair of scissors for cutting the fabric

A vacuum cleaner for cleaning the wooden chair’s fabric A cleaning solution for the chair’s fabric A cloth for drying the chair’s fabric

A small bowl for collecting the screws during disassembly

What You'll Need To Disassemble An Office Chair?
1

Before You Start

Before you disassemble an office chair, check its components for any signs of damage.

If you notice any broken parts, a professional advises the professional before proceeding with disassembly.

Before You Start

Next, could you make sure that you have enough space to work? You can always disassemble an office chair on your floor or couch, but putting it on an elevated surface like a table will be easier.

Lastly, I would like to ensure you have enough time for disassembly. Depending on the type of chair that you have, you could be at this for several hours.

If your chair has fabric upholstery, remove it before disassembling it.

A fabric upholstery can tear or tear while removing the screws, and it will be a lot easier to put everything back together when the chair’s fabric is out of the way.

2

Remove The Seat

The seat is usually held in place by four screws or bolts.

Once you remove them, the seat should lift off the frame. You can then clean the frame with a damp cloth.

Remove The Seat

If you notice any rust, you can use sandpaper to remove it. You can also use this opportunity to clean debris from the chair’s joints.

You can remove the rust with a wire brush if the chair’s joints look rusty. While you have a seat in the frame, you can clean the seat’s fabric with a vacuum cleaner.

You can also use a cleaning solution to remove any stains.

3

Remove The Armrests

If the chair you have has armrests, you should remove them before disassembling the rest.

In most cases, the armrests are attached to the chair’s frame with screws, so you should remove them with a screwdriver.

Remove The Armrests

If you have a swivel chair, you should remove the armrests before removing the casters.

Once you remove the armrests, you can clean the chair’s frame with a damp cloth. You can also clean the chair’s edge with a vacuum cleaner.

4

Remove The Casters/Wheels.

If your chair has casters or wheels, remove them before disassembling the rest.

You usually remove the casters with a hex key (or a hex wrench). You can also use a screwdriver or a hex key to remove the nuts that hold the casters in place.

Remove The Casters/Wheels.

Once you remove the casters, you can clean the chair’s frame with a damp cloth. You can also use a vacuum cleaner to clean the structure.

5

After Disassembly

After you finish disassembling the chair, you should clean the chair’s frame, seat, armrests, and casters.

You can clean the frame with a damp cloth and a cleaning solution. You can also use a wire brush to remove rust from the edge.

After Disassembly

You can clean the seat’s fabric with a vacuum cleaner and a cleaning solution. You can also use scissors to cut the fabric and clean the seat with a cloth. You can clean the armrests with a damp cloth and a cleaning solution.

You can also use a cloth to clean the armrests. You can clean the casters with a damp cloth and a cleaning solution. You can also use a material to clean the casters.

How To Disassemble An Office Chair Using A Disassembler

If dismantling an office chair with a hex key is not your thing, you can always purchase a disassembler and use it to dismantle it.

How To Disassemble An Office Chair Using A Disassembler

You can find disassemblers in any hardware store for about $25 (or less). You can disassemble the chair using the disassembler’s hex keys.

You use the hex keys to remove the hex bolts from the chair’s frame. You can then remove the chair’s fabric with the disassembler’s pliers.

You can use the disassembler’s pliers to remove the chair’s casters. You can also remove the casters with a hex wrench if you prefer.

Disassemble An Office Chair For Beginners

If the disassembly instructions above are a bit too confusing, you can always disassemble an office chair for beginners.

The first thing that you should do is place the chair upside down on a table. You can use a towel or a piece of cloth as a cushion so that the chair’s frame doesn’t scratch the table’s surface.

Next, remove the seat’s hex bolts with a hex key. Once you remove the seat, you can remove the hex bolts that hold the frame’s hex bolts. You can then remove the frame’s hex bolts.

Once you remove the hex bolts, you can lift the frame from the chair’s legs. You can then clean the chair’s fabric with a vacuum cleaner.

Save Time By Disassembling Your Chair In Advance.

If you know your office chair needs a thorough cleaning, you should disassemble it in advance.

You can disassemble an office chair in advance in one of two ways. The first way is to remove the hex bolts from the chair’s frame and set them aside. You can then remove the fabric from the shelf and set it aside.

Please clean the frame with a damp cloth and put it in a safe place. The second way is to use the disassembler’s pliers to unclasp the chair’s fabric.

You can then remove the hex bolts from the frame and set them aside.

You can then remove the chair’s frame from the chair’s legs. You can clean the chair’s fabric with a vacuum cleaner and place it in a safe place. You can also use a cloth to clean the material.

Conclusion

As you can see, you don’t have to live with an uncomfortable office chair.

You can disassemble an office chair when it becomes uncomfortable and clean it thoroughly, so it feels like new again. You can disassemble an office chair at any time of the year. You can do it to clean it thoroughly, or you can do it to improve how it looks.

You can disassemble an office chair as many times as you want. Now that you know how to disassemble an office chair, you should be able to clean it thoroughly and make it feel like new again.

FAQS

Can office chair be dismantled?

An office chair can be dismantled. Many manufacturers of office chairs include instructions on how to dismantle their product.
If you follow the instructions included with your chair, you should be able to safely dismantle and reassemble it. Doing so can help ensure the longevity of the chair, as well as the safety of both you and those around you.

How do you remove hydraulics from an office chair?

The hydraulic mechanism on most office chairs can be removed by lifting off the seat and unscrewing two knobs underneath the seat. The hydraulic mechanism is typically held in place by two C-clamps and will drop free from the chair when removed. Caution: Be careful to not drop the mechanism onto your foot.

Ron Mason
I, Ron Mason, am a retired forestry professional. My previous profession was that of an environmental educator, specifically as a Forester, with the USDA Forest Service. Additionally, I have worked as a contract forester in the private sector. With a strong background in science and engineering, my expertise lies in timber stand management, forest ecology, and wildlife biology. I am a dedicated woodworker and take pleasure in crafting furniture, tables, cabinets, and other wooden items as a hobby.