How To Remove Office Chair Cylinder – Maintenance Tips 2023

Reviewed By Chiropractic Specialist

Working in a desk job can be taxing on your body. It’s easy to develop neck, back, and wrist strain from sitting in the same position for hours.

Many office workers look for ways to increase their workstation ergonomics.

One way to do that is by adding an office chair with a lumbar support cylinder.

A lumbar support cylinder is a padded cushion on the back of your office chair that fits around the rear column of your chair.

Your lumbar support cylinder helps support your lower back and improves posture while you work.

The problem is that most people don’t keep their lumbar support cylinder in their office chairs indefinitely.

You might get used to taking it out when it’s not being used or want to remove it altogether for aesthetic reasons.

Whatever the case may be will show you how to remove a lumbar support cylinder from an office chair.

Tools You’ll Need

Tools You'll Need

There are a few tools you’ll need to remove a lumbar support cylinder, including:

A flathead screwdriver
A ratchet and socket set
A Phillips screwdriver

Quick Steps Of How To Remove Office Chair Cylinder

First, use the flathead screwdriver to remove the two screws holding the cylinder.

Then, use the Phillips screwdriver to remove the four screws that secure the cylinder to the chair’s frame.

Finally, use the ratchet and socket set to remove the two bolts holding the cylinder.

Step 1: Remove The Cushion From Your Chair

To remove your lumbar support cylinder, you’ll first want to remove the cushion from your seat cushion.

To do that, unclip the covering of your seat and remove the cushion. You’ll then want to unclip the lumbar support cylinder from the back of your chair.

Step 1: Remove The Cushion From Your Chair

If your lumbar support cylinder is just one piece, you’ll need to remove the screws that hold it onto the seat. If your lumbar support cylinder is two pieces, you’ll need to unclip it from the chair.

Step 2: Push In The Four Corners

Step 2: Push In The Four Corners

If your lumbar support cylinder is one piece and you must unscrew it from the seat, screw it back in.

If your lumbar support cylinder is two pieces, put the two pieces together with the cylinder facing you.

Next, you’ll want to fold the two corners so they’re inside the cylinder and folded in half. These two corners are what will unlock the cylinder.

Step 3: Unlock The Cylinder And Take It Out

With the corners folded and the cylinder facing you, you’ll want to push the corners into the cylinder.

You’ll hear a click as the corners unlock the cylinder, and the cylinder will be able to be removed from the back of your chair.

Step 3: Unlock The Cylinder And Take It Out

Grab the cylinder with both hands and lift it off the back of your chair. If you don’t leave the cylinder in your chair, be sure to store it in a safe place so it doesn’t get damaged.

How to Remove a Lumbar Support Cylinder

If your lumbar support cylinder no longer provides the support you need, you may want to remove it. Here is a detailed guide on how to do so:

How to Remove a Lumbar Support Cylinder

1. Begin by disconnecting any power sources to the lumbar support cylinder. If it is battery-operated, remove the batteries. If it is plugged into an outlet, unplug it.

2. Next, locate the release mechanism on the lumbar support cylinder. This is typically a knob or lever that can be turned or pulled to release the cylinder from its housing.

3. Pull the lumbar support cylinder from its housing once the release mechanism has been activated. When handling the housing, take care not to damage it.

4. The lumbar support cylinder should be disposed of appropriately. You can recycle metal if it’s made of that material. Plastics should be disposed of in your regular garbage.

Conclusion

Keep in mind that removing the lumbar support cylinder from your office chair is not a long-term solution.

When you remove the lumbar support cylinder, you’ll be putting your lower back at risk again. To protect against long-term damage, invest in a high-quality ergonomic office chair with built-in lumbar support.

These chairs will improve your posture while you work and help prevent long-term back damage.

If you have questions about removing a lumbar support cylinder, contact your chair manufacturer.

FAQS

How do you remove a cylinder chair without damaging it?

There are different ways to remove a cylinder chair without damaging it. One way is to use a furniture dolly. This is a dolly that is specifically designed to move furniture. You can rent one from a local hardware store or moving company. Another way is to use a furniture sling. This is a piece of fabric that you slip under the chair and then lift with your arms. This is a good option if you don’t have someone to help you lift the chair. Finally, you can use a furniture lifting strap. This strap goes around the chair, and you lift it with your arms. This is a good option if you have someone to help raise the chair.

How do you get a stuck cylinder out of a desk chair?

If you have a stuck cylinder on a desk chair, you can try a few things to get out. First, try unscrewing the top of the cylinder to see if that releases the stuck part. If that doesn’t work, you can use a plunger to push the stuck part out from the bottom. If neither works, you may need to take the chair apart to get to the cylinder and release it.

How do you remove a cylinder from a chair without a hammer?

You can use a screwdriver or a drill if you need to remove a cylinder from a chair without a hammer. First, find the screws that hold the cylinder in place. Unscrew these screws and then pull the cylinder out of the chair.

Ron Mason
I, Ron Mason, am a retired forestry professional. My previous profession was that of an environmental educator, specifically as a Forester, with the USDA Forest Service. Additionally, I have worked as a contract forester in the private sector. With a strong background in science and engineering, my expertise lies in timber stand management, forest ecology, and wildlife biology. I am a dedicated woodworker and take pleasure in crafting furniture, tables, cabinets, and other wooden items as a hobby.